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English

There is no such thing as a right or wrong evaluation; the key is how well your analysis is supported and the quality of the evidence used.

I overview
The ability to communicate a message through writing is essential in any career. Effective writing shapes and informs the opinions of its readers. The writing process can be intimidating; however, the more you work with it, the more comfortable the process becomes.
Prompt
For this project, you will build upon the outline of the essay you have developed while incorporating your instructor’s feedback. Use the prompt questions below to help you develop your publish. In addition, you will pull out quotes and paraphrases from your selected reading and write summaries that you will use to support your analysis.
When you are done responding to the prompts below, you will have the first publish of your critical analysis essay. In the following module, you will complete a revision activity to further improve this publish.
Specifically, you must address the following rubric criteria:
I. Introduction
The introduction of your essay is where readers will learn what your essay is about. Do not give all your information away here. Instead, give readers a sample of what is to come and what you will be supporting with evidence in the body of the essay. Do not forget to review your outline to make sure you briefly cover all of the key points you identified. If your claim and key points have changed since then, it is okay! For your new ideas, seek feedback from your instructor or writing resources available through SNHU.
Provide an overview of the work you have analyzed, briefly describing the main points and your reaction to the author’s claim.
Compose a thesis that you will support with evidence throughout the essay. This statement will give direction to your essay and should be well thought out.
II. Body
The body is your opportunity to support your evaluation of the author’s argument. Ensure that your thoughts and evidence are clear and easy to read and understand.
Be sure to write organized paragraphs that clearly state their main idea and move logically from one to the other.
Your body paragraphs should support your thesis by combining thoughts and ideas with evidence or key points from the selected reading. There is no such thing as a right or wrong evaluation; the key is how well your analysis is supported and the quality of the evidence used.
III. Conclusion
Think of the conclusion paragraph as a review of your analysis. Use this section to restate your evaluation and remind readers of your supporting evidence. Think of this paragraph as your last chance to prove your point.
Briefly summarize the main points that helped form your analysis. This section should consist of a brief review of your main ideas.
Draw conclusions based on your evidence.
Use evidence that you have found to wrap up the essay in a meaningful way that relates to your audience.
Guidelines for Submission
Your analysis essay must be 3–4 pages (plus references) and must be written in MLA or APA format. Use double spacing, 12-point Times New Roman font, and one-inch margins.
Module Five Assignment Rubric
Criteria Proficient (100%) Needs Improvement (75%) Not Evident (0%) Value
Introduction: Overview Provides an overview of the work being analyzed Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include greater clarity in providing an overview of the work being analyzed Does not attempt criterion 15
Introduction: Thesis Composes a thesis that covers the analysis that will be developed throughout the essay Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include greater clarity and relevance in the thesis statement Does not attempt criterion 15
Body: Main Idea Writes multiple paragraphs that are focused, clearly state their intent, and build the analysis Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include building accurately on the analysis for the writing of the paragraphs Does not attempt criterion 15
Body: Support Thesis Body paragraphs support the thesis by combining thoughts and ideas with evidence Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include combining thoughts and ideas with evidence Does not attempt criterion 15
Conclusion: Summarize Summarizes the main ideas that helped form analysis Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include greater alignment of the key supporting points to the evaluation Does not attempt criterion 15
Conclusion: Evidence Draws conclusions based on evidence to close the essay in a meaningful way that relates to the audience Shows progress toward proficiency, but with errors or omissions; areas for improvement may include concisely connecting findings to the audience Does not attempt criterion 15
Articulation of Response Clearly conveys meaning with grammatical choices, sentence structure, and spelling that demonstrate an understanding of audience and purpose Shows progress toward proficiency, but with inconsistencies in grammatical conventions, sentence structure, and spelling, negatively impacting readability The submission has critical inconsistencies in grammatical conventions, sentence structure, and spelling, preventing understanding of ideas 10
Total: I am working on my publish phase and need the whole paper written.

Categories
English

For your second post, respond to at least one other student’s posts (75 word minimum).

As we turn our attention from the Remembered Event/Personal Narrative Essay to the Profile Essay, examine the lecture on the Art of the Profile and the guidelines for the Profile essay and choose one of the profile essays in week 4 and write a critique of the essay: how does it fit the definition of a profile essay, how is it organized, and how and why is it an effective profile essay (150 word minimum). For your second post, respond to at least one other student’s posts (75 word minimum). For your third post, offer your five key principles for an effective profile essay, citing at least one example from the model essays to support each principle (100 word minimum).

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English

I have given 2 examples of what a good format for a resume looks like, so you can go based on that.

Hey, Could you please format my resume to make it look professional, and also please make it fit on one page. I have given 2 examples of what a good format for a resume looks like, so you can go based on that.

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English

If you have a preferred name you like to go by, please include that as well.

include a brief introduction and tell us something interesting about you! If you have a preferred name you like to go by, please include that as well.
After watching this week’s video, what are three strategies that you will implement in order to find success in English Composition this term? (USLO 1.1)
What do you do when undertaking the writing process? Then, compare that to the process prescribed in the content for this unit. How are they different? How are they the same? (USLO 1.1)
Finally, what motivates you? Please share a photograph with us showing us what (or who) serves as your motivation. It might be handy to print this and keep it close to help serve as motivation throughout this course!
Your initial response should have your informed input and should be at least 100 words. Your input should be in your own words, demonstrating your understanding and comprehension of the topic. Remember to include an in-text citation and a reference in APA 7th-edition format

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English

Using evidence from the novel, illustrate why such responsibilities should be considered too heavy a burden for women to cary.

In William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying, two women feel pressured to accept the responsibilities of motherhood. Using evidence from the novel, Illustrate why such responsibilities should be considered too heavy a burden for women to cary.

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English

How does the tone affect the author’s credibility?

Metacognitive Reading Log
Section 1: Important Ideas and Information in the Text
Prior to diving into reading the text, skim it to get an idea of its length and a general idea of what the reading is all about. Then, read the text, taking note of important ideas and information in the beginning, middle and end of the reading. For each section (beginning, middle and end), list your thoughts, feelings and/or questions about the ideas and information you identified as important to the text. Please include page numbers.
Page(s)/paragraph in the Beginning of the Text:
Important Ideas and Information
Thoughts, Feelings, Questions:
Page(s)/paragraph in the Middle of the Text:
Important Ideas and Information
Thoughts, Feelings, Questions:
Page(s)/paragraph at the End of the Text:
Important Ideas and Information:
Thoughts, Feelings, Questions:

Section 2: Challenging Passages
In this section, identify passages or parts of the text that you found challenging (as in difficult to understand or even passages that “challenged” previously held assumptions).
Challenging Passage 1:
What makes the passage challenging?
Challenging Passage 2:
What makes the passage challenging?
Section 3: Golden Lines
A “golden line” is a sentence (or two) that stands out to you which you think is important to the text. Perhaps, in your opinion, it precisely captures what the text is all about or it says something important about an issue raised in the text. Select at least two “golden lines” (quotes) to complete this section.
Golden Line 1:
Why did you choose this golden line?
Golden Line 2
Why did you choose this golden line?
Section 4: Five Unfamiliar Words in the Text
List five unfamiliar words that you encountered while reading the text, along with the page number where the word appears and its definition.
Page number, word and definition:
Page number, word and definition:
Page number, word and definition
Page number, word and definition:
Page number, word and definition:
Section 5: Rhetorical Understanding
Rhetorical understanding refers to how the text works and why it works that way: how the author organizes the text, what tone they use, how they explain and support their argument, etc.
How does the author establish ethos in the text? How does the tone affect the author’s credibility? Identify an example from the text.
How does the author appeal to reason or logos? What evidence does the author provide? Why is it (or isn’t it) reliable? Identify an example from the text.
How does the author appeal to emotions and pathos? What emotions does the author want to evoke in their audience? What values are they appealing to? Identify an example from the text.

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English

Would deeper examination on this topic be relevant?

The purpose of your final assignment is to study and write about a particular literacy group, community, or subculture. Keep this assignment in mind as the course progresses.
1. Your role in this assignment is that of a primary researcher. The point of ethnography is to watch, to try to understand what’s going on, and to ask questions to test your observations.You will become an expert on the community and how it works.
2. Choose a space/place/community where literacy is happening. I had chosen Migrant Education, Speech and Debate Tournament, they work at the Community Learning Center at Brawley Elementary School District. This could be a library where people are reading, working on computers, or writing. Or, you could choose a classroom, hallway, bedroom, living room, work place, etc. This space could also be online. For example, you could study a literacy community like Dungeons and Dragons or KPop or a fan site online. This should be a space where the literacy practices are ones you want to learn more about or one you are already a part of and want to share. This can be a group that meets face-to-face or it can be an online group. Here are some examples of the kinds of things students have studied in the past:
Literacies of KPop, Van Life, the identities of Starbucks’ baristas, national women’s soccer, spiritual communities, greek life, chefs, family literacies, gaming, TikTok, counseling support services, and LBGTQ+ communities.
3. Determine your interview and research method you have learned about during this course to describe and analyze how reading and writing operates within the space. Use our readings and our discussions to guide your use of terms and concepts.
4. Closely observe your space/group for a week.
Your mini-ethnography will also include a short in-person, Zoom or email interview with one person connected to this literacy space.
You will set up an interview with your interviewee and record their responses. The interview is an opportunity to gain another perspective on the literacy practices that shape or take place within the space. Record and/or transcribe the interview. You often don’t know what’s an important detail until later. Then read and reread your notes, noticing what seems most important or interesting.
Focus on making a claim about your group, a claim that might consider (but not be limited by) the following questions:
What “work” does literacy do in the group?
How is literacy learning sponsored?
What genres are used? Why? To what extent is the new media a component of the work?
What does “literacy” in this group look like? What is its purpose?
What is the role of literacy for newcomers? How does literacy facilitate or inhibit membership in the group? What role does literacy play in leadership? How does literacy support the structure of the group? To what degree is the group’s organization hierarchical or egalitarian (or in between)? How does literacy create, support, or maintain that organization?
You will write up your findings from your observation and interview using details from your field notes and your interview transcriipts.
Composing the Ethnography Essay:
Although there is no one “correct” way of composing ethnography essays, you are being asked to follow this basic structure for yours:
Introduction: What is your topic/big question? Why did you choose this site, culture, or group? What do you hope to learn? What is the relevance of this inquiry? You may include secondary sources in this section if appropriate.
Assumptions & Early Hypotheses: How did you feel about it going in? What assumptions did you make about this site, culture, or group? What does research say about this topic? How does this research inform your assumptions? Include secondary sources in this section.
Methodology: What methods did you take in this inquiry? What was your process for gathering information? How did you make observations? Where did you go? What did you notice? Who did you speak with? Did you conduct formal/informal interviews? What did you photograph?
Data Analysis: Here is where you analyze and make sense of your observations and all of the information you collected. What is significant about your observations? How did the interviews give you insight into your research? How did the data as a whole contribute to your understanding of this topic? Are they to some extent aligned with the research that you read? Were you surprised by any discoveries?
Conclusion: Ultimately, what were your findings? Do any of your questions or thoughts remain unclear? Would deeper examination on this topic be relevant? If so, why?
Your final submission should include the following:
Apply MLA format: Times New Roman, font size 12, with one-inch margins on all sides and double-spaced.
Include section titles (introduction, methodology, conclusion, etc.) aligned left, in bolded font.
Include at least three outside sources in your introduction and/or assumptions/early hypotheses sections. Make sure to include a works cited page at the end.
Include at least three photographs and your field notes in the essay. It is up to you whether you would like to place the photographs within and throughout the essay (like the samples we’ve seen) or attach them all at the end. Include a short caption describing each photograph. Please attach your field notes at the very end as well.
Your essay should consist of approximately 4-6 (longer is fine) typed pages and include generous literacy examples from the group/space you are studying and the person you interviewed. Please draw from our readings to support your analysis.

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English

Part ii: rhetorical analysis

please READ article “The Digital Divide Among Students During Covid-19” . and Chapter 4 ( Everything’s An Argument with Readings 9th Edition ) and review chapter 4 Arguments Based on Logos notes in the files and review chapter 1 notes in the file provided.
Read article “The Digital Divide Among Students During Covid-19” (pgs. 604-608) and chapter 4 in Everything’s An Argument with Readings 9th Edition is written by Andrea A. Lunsford; John J. Ruszkiewicz; Keith Walters and published by Bedford/St. its in the files please use that one. and write a short analysis for it. Pay attention to and elaborate on the use of Logos in the article.
Read the assigned article and complete the following assignment.
Part I: Summary
Summarize the article in one paragraph, around 100
NOTE: You must follow the summarization guidelines posted in files provided .
Part II: Rhetorical Analysis
Analyze the article for specific elements listed below, 250 words
Tip: Review the power point for chapter 1 for help with the terminology its in the files provided
identify the intended audience for the article
Identify the reason for the argument (review the term if necessary)
Identify the occasion for the argument (review the term if necessary)
Identify the type of argument offered by the author (factual, definition, evaluation, etc.).
Explain in detail how the author uses LOGOS in the argument, the type of hard evidence offered, and provide several specific examples.
Evaluate the overall strength and effectiveness of the author’s argument.
Part III – Your response to the article
What is your take on the issue under discussion? What was your personal experience with education during COVID-19 lockdowns? Elaborate in an extended paragraph (200 words).
Format
Use MLA page format, font Times New Roman in size 12
Include MLA citation for the textbook article (see EAA pgs.508-510 #3 and #10)
NOTE to writer Please i mean please read all the instructions and reading i assigned to do this assignment. everything i provided will help write this assignment. i Provided the short anaylsis directions in the files please look at it and summary guideline on how to write an summary . NO plagiarism. use the files i provided and not outside source.

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English

You will use the book passing by nella larson and the first chapter of “black writers, white publishers” by john k.

For the short essay, imagine how you, as an editor, would respond to the existence of the two published endings of Passing. 2/3 of the essay should be your rationale as if you would present it to a publisher, and 1/3 should reflect your understanding of John Young’s chapter. You are not summarizing Young’s chapter, just showing how it influences your position. This essay should consider the existing scholarly research but should not summarize it. This can be done in many formats (a proposal, letter, book forward, etc.). The essay should address your management and why. This assignment can be written in the first person. It should be 1200 words minimum. You will use the book Passing by Nella Larson and the first chapter of “Black writers, White Publishers” by John K. Young to write this essay.

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English

Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.

In MLA format, analyze the piece “Out, Out—“ by Robert Frost. You can use a reading comprehension question at the end of the piece to formulate your analysis. “Analyze the piece; don’t just summarize it.”
Comprehension Question:
What does Frost’s reference to Macbeth contribute to your understanding of “Out, Out—“? How would you state the theme of Frost’s poem?
“Out, Out—“ By Robert Frost:
The buzz saw snarled and rattled in the yard
And made dust and dropped stove-length sticks of wood,
Sweet-scented stuff when the breeze drew across it.
And from there those that lifted eyes could count
Five mountain ranges one behind the other
Under the sunset far into Vermont.
And the saw snarled and rattled, snarled and rattled,
As it ran light, or had to bear a load.
And nothing happened: day was all but done.
Call it a day, I wish they might have said
To please the boy by giving him the half hour
That a boy counts so much when saved from work.
His sister stood beside him in her apron
To tell them ‘Supper.’ At the word, the saw,
As if to prove saws knew what supper meant,
Leaped out at the boy’s hand, or seemed to leap—
He must have given the hand. However it was,
Neither refused the meeting. But the hand!
The boy’s first outcry was a rueful laugh,
As he swung toward them holding up the hand
Half in appeal, but half as if to keep
The life from spilling. Then the boy saw all—
Since he was old enough to know, big boy
Doing a man’s work, though a child at heart—
He saw all spoiled. ‘Don’t let him cut my hand off—
The doctor, when he comes. Don’t let him, sister!’
So. But the hand was gone already.
The doctor put him in the dark of ether.
He lay and puffed his lips out with his breath.
And then—the watcher at his pulse took fright.
No one believed. They listened at his heart.
Little—less—nothing!—and that ended it.
No more to build on there. And they, since they
Were not the one dead, turned to their affairs.