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Literature

Also, please no plagiarism at all.

All instructions are in document below. Also, please NO PLAGIARISM AT ALL. This will be turned in using Turnitin.com. The only sources are the two books labeled in the document.

Categories
Literature

Please notify me what book you have chosen because i also have to do a poster.

Attached a screenshot of the details. Please notify me what book you have chosen because I also have to do a poster. So preferably choose a book with some illustration work. Thanks

Categories
Literature

Phonics does not have to be emergent level, but can be.

Create your own emergent reader support activity on phonemic awareness OR for phonics instruction and practice. Pay attention to your assigned skill.
Explore: https://fcrr.org/student-center-activities (Links to an external site.) This website provides a plethora of activities for you to browse and utilize as a basis for your two activities. Remember, we are looking at emergent literacy for phonemic awareness so use your knowledge of emergent literacy from the course and materials to choose this appropriately. Phonics does not have to be emergent level, but can be.
Use these as a guide and design your own-it CANNOT be a worksheet and writing assignment.
Explain the activity, what grades it targets, how it is a phonics specific activity. (use specific support from the textbook to explain)
You do not have to use an activity provided above, it is there if you need it though. You may also search teacher blogs, Pinterest, or choose one from the website above and put your own spin or flare on it to make it more engaging or more visually pleasing.
Be creative. Adjust and modify to make them your own or create one entirely new.

Categories
Literature

Do not submit your first publish; carefully revise, proofread, and edit (ideally after a writing services (links to an external site.)

Write a thesis-driven essay (approx. 1,000-1,200 words) that uses Cohen’s “Monster Culture” Download “Monster Culture”and/or Freud’s “The Uncanny” (Links to an external site.) as a theoretical basis for interpreting and analyzing one of the following novels:
Ira Levin, Rosemary’s Baby
Shirley Jackson, The Haunting of Hill House
Formatting & Logistics
Length: approx. 1,000-1,200 words
MLA Format (Links to an external site.)
1″ margins
Use double-spaced text throughout (incl. header and Works Cited)
First page only: include a heading (upper left), with your name, your professor’s title/name, course prefix/number, and the date
Include a title (centered, same size and style font as the rest of the document)
Insert a running header (top right margin), featuring your last name and the page number
Include an MLA-style Works Cited (Links to an external site.)
Use MLA in-text citations (Links to an external site.) for any quotations
Instructions
In contrast to your response papers, this assignment calls for you to write a formal essay featuring a sustained, cohesive textual analysis of an assigned primary text (i.e., Rosemary’s Baby or The Haunting of Hill House). That analysis should draw on the theoretical concepts of “Monster Culture” Download “Monster Culture”(Cohen) or “The Uncanny” (Links to an external site.) (Freud). With these parameters, almost any topic is acceptable. Broadly speaking, this type of essay seeks to answer the following questions: what meaning/effect does the literary text create, how does the text use particular literary devices to create that meaning/effect, and how do those devices operate in relation to the text’s broader themes?
In addressing this sort of question, your essay should consist of three basic parts:
An introduction, usually a single paragraph, identifies the text (i.e., author’s full name, title, year of publication), provides context, and culminates in an interpretive thesis statement (i.e., the claim you will support).
A multi-paragraph body elaborates and supports the thesis through analysis; each paragraph of the body includes a topic sentence, textual evidence, and an explanation of that evidence.
A conclusion offers a final perspective on the paper’s argument—not a mere restatement of the introduction.
Throughout, use the methods and vocabulary of literary analysis—particularly “close readings” of specific passages—while minimizing plot synopses and generalities. Your interpretation does not have to be definitive or “right,” but it does have to be based on evidence from the relevant primary and secondary texts.
Guidelines: interpretation and analysis
Make sure that your thesis is neither too narrow not too broad; restrict yourself to a single topic, rather than trying to do too much.
Include a formal introduction, featuring relevant details of the text (author’s full name, text title, publication year) and culminating with your specific, arguable thesis statement (i.e., the interpretive claim you will support in your essay).
Support your thesis statement (i.e., interpretive claim) with direct textual evidence (i.e., direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries), properly cited.
Provide analysis that demonstrates how the textual evidence supports your interpretive claim.
Focus on interpretation and analysis, avoiding extended plot synopses, summaries, and generalities.
Consider text’s form (e.g., language and style), not just its content (e.g., plot and theme).
Include a formal conclusion.
You may incorporate language from your response papers; I will not treat such usage as plagiarism.
You are not expected to consult additional research (beyond the Cohen and/or Freud essays). However, you are free to draw on lectures and class discussions. If you use outside sources, you must cite them properly, or else you are committing plagiarism.
Guidelines: writing style
Adhere to the conventions of academic writing (e.g., use a formal style; avoid phrases such as “I think that…”).
Structure: each paragraph should begin with a topic sentence that develops your thesis statement, and the rest of the paragraph should support the claim of that topic sentence.
On quotations:
Include attributive tags.
Avoid dropped quotes (Links to an external site.).
Avoid unnecessarily lengthy quotations.
Clarify how each quotation supports your argument.
Avoid ending paragraphs with quotations.
Use the present tense when referring to a text (e.g., “Cohen argues that…”).
Eschew sweeping generalizations (e.g., “In today’s society…,” “Due to human nature…”).
Limit use of passive voice.
Do not overuse the verb “to be” (“is,” “are,” “was,” “were,” etc.); in fact, English has many verbs.
Do not abuse adverbs (e.g., “very”).
Do not use exclamation points, ever (unless in a quotation)!!!
Do not use “this” as an unsupported pronoun; “this” what?
Please, please, please learn the different uses of the word “however” (Links to an external site.) and how to punctuate each of them properly.
Do not underline or bold the title of your paper, put it quotation marks, enlarge the font, or skip extra lines.
Per MLA style, italicize the titles of books (including novels); place the titles of short works (e.g., essays) in double quotation marks.
Do not submit your first publish; carefully revise, proofread, and edit (ideally after a Writing Services (Links to an external site.) consultation).

Categories
Literature

Think about how identity, including attributes such as gender, race, class and culture might play a role in a story’s plot, character development, and theme.

Aristotle captured some of these concepts in his works on the structure of plays in the Poetica. His legacy is still the foundation of literature that students learn in the ninth grade about stories: plot, character; theme, and beyond.
Think about how identity, including attributes such as gender, race, class and culture might play a role in a story’s plot, character development, and theme.
Then, make up a short story using one or more identity elements as a key part of the plot, character, and theme. You can base your story on one that is well-known if you like. And offer a paragraph or two about how the concepts of Aristotle contribute to your being able to create your story.
Some resourceful links:
https://www.presspage.com/news/lessons-from-ancient-greece-aristotle-on-storytelling/

Please feel free to reach out to me for any further instructions.

Categories
Literature

2.a dominant theme of one of the assigned poems;

Construct a one-paragraph argument about one of the following topics:
1.The tone of one of the assigned poems;
2.a dominant theme of one of the assigned poems;
3.the speaker of one of the assigned poems; or
4.the use of irony in one of the assigned poems.

Categories
Literature

Please copy and paste the table into a document that you will submit on owl “assignments.”

After picking ONE of the EIGHT disciplines/broad disciplinary groups from Table A below, ideally the group for the discipline that you are currently majoring in or would like to major in, choose ONE key genre for that group from Table A, and choose ONE model text from Table A that is written in this genre. All model texts listed in Table A are available as PDF documents in the OWL “Resources” tool (see the folder titled “Writing in the Disciplines Models”).
This assignment asks you to fill out Table B below. This will be your point-form rhetorical analysis of the model text. Please copy and paste the table into a document that you will submit on OWL “Assignments.”

Categories
Literature

There’s no upper limit, so write on, if you wish: everything you write will be considered.

**Whatever option you decide to go with, I can provide the book pages (images) and the documents of the theories
You can choose to write this assignment on either Hanna’s article (Reader Response) or Howard’s article (Structuralism). Just pick ONE.
Option A: Hanna (Reader Response applied to Sir Gawain)
This journal entry is based on Ralph Hanna’s article on the interpretations of the girdle in SGGK that we read as our example of Reader Response theory in action (it’s pp. 116-31 in the Norton and we discussed this on Sep 2).
In this journal entry, you need to do three things:
1. Identify and explain ONE theoretical concept from Reader Response theory. You can use Iser (eg “expectations,” “gaps,” “alien associations,” “memory”) or Fish (“interpretive communities”, or “experience as meaning”). You should quote from the theorist and briefly explain and unpack the concept you’ve chosen.
2. Then, explain how a specific portion of Hanna’s analysis is informed by this concept. For instance, if I write about Version 4 of the girdle (the girdle proclaimed by Arthur and Camelot as a mark of honor and fellowship), I could use Fish’s idea of interpretive communities (and how the interpretive assumptions of the community produces ‘the meaning’ of the girdle). Another example, when discussing Version 1 of the girdle (It’s Magic!) Hanna argues that the way we’ve experienced the text (our expectations about what’s important) jostle against this interpretation. Of course, you need to elaborate to explain how Hanna’s argument is grounded in the particular concept you’ve chosen.
In this section, I suggest that you pick one version of the girdle that Hanna discusses and see if you can find the connections between a theoretical concept in Reader Response and how Hanna makes his point.
3. Finally, take that very concept that you’ve been working with and apply it to another section/ detail/ episode/ character / symbol in the text. Here, you would see if you can work your own analysis of another textual element through the same conceptual lens that you’ve already identified in Hanna’s reading of the girdle.
More Notes on Hanna’s Article
If you paid attention in class, I suspect that this assignment should be rather easy at the level of generating content. However, it might still be challenging to write about a critic’s arguments and theoretical assumptions in a cogent way. So, stick to this three-part structure that I’ve given you.
Ideally, you should read over at least one or two of Hanna’s “Versions of the girdle” sections before deciding which is a. the best version to discuss and b. the theoretical concept from Iser or Fish to use.
Always keep in view the fact that Hanna’s “big argument” isn’t about ratifying one particular version of the girdle. Instead, it’s about re-framing the various “meanings” imputed to the girdle such that the difficult issue of interpretation itself is the subject at hand.
Option B: Howard (Structuralism applied to Sir Gawain)
This journal entry is based on Donald Howard’s article on the binary between the shield and the girdle in SGGK that we read as our example of structuralism in action (it’s pp. 106-116 in the Norton and we discussed this on Sep 2).
In this journal entry, you need to do three things:
1. Identify and explain ONE theoretical concept from structuralism. You can use Saussure (eg what are the two components that make up the sign? “The sign is arbitrary”; “The linear dimension of the sign” ) or Jakobson (“the substitutive” and the “combinative”; the binary categories that structure analysis). You should quote from the theorist and briefly explain and unpack the concept / feature of structuralism you’ve chosen. You could use Parker here to supplement some of the theory, especially if you’re focusing on the procedure of coding, finding categories, and the binary logic that governs structuralist frameworks.
2. Then, explain how a specific portion of Howard’s analysis is informed by this concept. For instance, if you’re interested in the “arbitrary” nature of of the sign, you might focus on how Howard (near his opening) argues for the relational significance between the girdle and shield. Or, if you’re interested in the way structuralism splits the sign into the “signifier” and “signified,” you can identify how Howard uses this logic in attributing “signifieds” to the girdle and shield that he then uses to analyze the narrative structure of the corresponding episodes.
3. Finally, try to apply the analytical approach that you’ve been commenting on to another episode or character that Howard hasn’t really touched on. For instance, do the binaries also apply to some of the characters like Queen Guinevere, Lady B., and Morgan le Fay? Are there other episodes that Howard hasn’t analyzed too deeply (eg correspondences between the seduction and the hunts) that could benefit from the binary structure between honor and dishonor that Howard sets-up?
Length Requirement
The entry needs to be at least 600-words long. (It’s an electronic submission so words can be counted easily. Plus, I have the superpower of knowing when a scriipt is short …). There’s no upper limit, so write on, if you wish: everything you write will be considered.
Short responses will be penalized by taking a percentage of the projected grade. EG, a 500 word entry that might have earned a 90 would earn (500/600 x 90) = 75. This is meant to be a deterrent, so meet the minimum!

Categories
Literature

If not, why not?

After you’ve read the assigned pages from Beowulf, Please read the excerpt from Grendel (below). In a well-developed paragraph (500 words), discuss the concept of good versus evil. We are viewing Beowulf as a hero who represents good and Grendel as the villain who represents evil. Does the excerpt from Grendel’s point of view change your idea of good versus evil? If so, how? If not, why not? Upload your response here. Please double space and use MLA format. This writing isn’t exactly a formal essay, but please follow the same pattern: use third person (no I, we, you); no in my opinion, I believe, I think, etc, or in conclusion.

Categories
Literature

See instructions.

See instructions.
Its very imortant that the speech follows the given order and is easy to understand for a 13 yeaars old. No hard words and meanings.